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June 16, 2014

NIAC Welcomes Potential U.S.-Iran Discussions on Iraq

Press Release - For Immediate Release

The National Iranian American Council (NIAC) released the following statement in response to reports of potential discussions between the U.S. and Iran on the situation in Iraq:

News that the Obama administration will reach out to Iran over the security situation in Iraq is a welcome and sensible development that could strengthen the US response to the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Shams (ISIS).

For too long, institutionalized silence between the US and Iran has prevented cooperation on issues of mutual interest and importance. This silence has fed perceptions that Iran is the implacable enemy of the United States and vice versa. Now that the wall of silence has been broken by the ongoing nuclear talks in Vienna, new opportunities to diplomatically resolve seemingly intractable situations – including in Iraq, Syria, and Afghanistan – could emerge.

This new development will also provide a boost to the atmosphere of negotiations toward a comprehensive nuclear deal. Achieving a negotiated agreement to resolve the nuclear dispute by the July 20thdeadline is in the interest of all parties involved because it will present further opportunities to address mutual interests.

Regardless of the outcome of discussions on Iraq and the collaboration therefrom, the U.S. and Iran are on the precipice of a virtuous cycle.  Recognition of strategic convergence beyond the nuclear issue will add to the urgency of striking a nuclear deal, while progress at the negotiating table will continue to break down presumptions of mutual hostility and broaden recognition of common interests.

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The National Iranian American Council (NIAC) is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing the interests of the Iranian-American community. We accomplish our mission by supplying the resources, knowledge and tools to enable greater civic participation by Iranian Americans and informed decision-making by policymakers.

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