Iran Unfiltered, Week of October 1st

Iran Hits ISIS Over Ahvaz Attack as Rial Stops Downward Spiral

Iran Unfiltered is a weekly digest tracking Iranian politics & society by the National Iranian American Council | Subscribe Here

  • Continued Currency Fluctuations Surprisingly Lead to Rial Strengthening
  • Parliament to Review Key Anti-Money Laundering Bill to Meet FATF Standards
  • Drone and Missile Strikes Hit ISIS in Response to Ahvaz Attack
  • MP Denounces Arrest of Local Official Who Defended Bahais
  • Ayatollah Khamenei Delivers Defiant Anti-US Speech at Tehran’s Azadi Stadium  

After months of fluctuations and steady devaluation, the Iranian Rial rebounded sharply against the dollar this week. Analysts attributed the currency’s strengthening to multiple factors, from new authorities given to the Central Bank to currency speculators offloading dollars to maximize profits. Iran also launched missile and—for the first time—drone strikes against ISIS targets in Eastern Syria, which officials described as retaliation for last week’s Ahvaz terrorist attack. In domestic politics, a senior judiciary official announced that over 25 have been sentenced as part of an on-going corruption probe, with three sentenced to death. A city councilman in Shiraz has also been detained over remarks defending two recently arrested members of the Bahai faith. Meanwhile, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei made a rare appearance in Tehran’s Azadi sport stadium, and in a defiant speech denounced U.S. pressure policies and called for resilience.

 

Iranian Rial Rebounds

On Monday, October 1st, the Rial reversed its downward trajectory and made gains against the dollar. The Rial’s gains came after the Economic Coordination Council—a body comprised of members of the judiciary, executive, and legislative branches of the Iranian government—gave new authorities to the Central Bank to intervene in the currency market on Saturday. The free-market rate for U.S. dollars dropped to roughly 15,000 tomans by close of the market on Monday evening, down from its peak of over 17,000 tomans that morning.

The new measures allow the Central Bank to provide hard currency to the market. According to news site Entekhab: “The permission granted to the Central Bank to intervene in the free market exchange rate through banks and currency dealers in the past week has resulted in the Central Bank obligating banks to provide hard currency to meet the needs of citizens. These needs include currency for students, research, medical purposes, and civilian aviation equipment.”

Experts attribute the Rial’s gains to multiple factors, from speculators playing the market to progress in Iran’s negotiations with Europe to salvage the nuclear deal. According to the economics-focused Donya Eqtesad: “Experts have two different views over the decrease in the price of the dollar. One group believes that the rapid price fall in the third day of the week was a price correction. In their view, the speculators gradually began selling off their purchases from past few weeks and are searching for a new floor to start buying again.”

Currency market speculators may have believed the price of the dollar had hit a ceiling and thus began selling dollars to maximize profits. Donya Eqtesad notes that last week, the cost of the dollar rose sharply, prompting speculators to sell. “Some currency traders at the beginning of the month [late September] bought dollars for around 14,000 tomans. After the cost of dollars reached a ceiling of 19,000 tomans, they gradually became sellers [of dollars] and made a lot of profit from such selling and buying.”

The new measures announced by the Central Bank may have also triggered currency speculators to begin selling dollars. Donya Eqtesad notes: “Other experts believe that the announcement of new policies by the Central Bank for providing currency, gave traders a signal to start selling … the signal was given to traders that the Central Bank has enough currency to intervene in the market and meet the country’s needs.”

Other reasons offered for the rial’s gains include news of a potential EU-Iran agreement to facilitate trade after U.S. sanctions come into force. According to Donya Eqtesad: “Other reasons are also heard in the market … the announcement of a new mechanism by which the Central Bank will provide currency, the likelihood that the FATF bills will be approved in the coming days, the positive view many traders have of the agreement between Iran and Europe, and the increase in the price of oil are all other reasons that, in the view of experts, have had an impact in changing the trajectory of the market.”

On Tuesday, October 2nd, the Economic Coordination Council held another meeting to further discuss giving the Central Bank increased authorities to control the currency market. The council passed a measure obligating the Central Bank to immediately make the necessary arrangements for the selling and purchasing of foreign currency from exports of petrochemicals, steel, and other exports products and making the currency available in the secondary exchange market. The council also passed a measure that would give five-year residency to citizens of foreign countries who invest at least $250,000 in Iran, based on criteria laid out by the government [Rouhani administration].

 

FATF Bills Make Headway in Parliament

The debate over Iran passing legislation to meet the action plan set out by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) has gained intensity due to the prospect of parliament approving legislation for Iran’s ascension to the terrorist financing convention. Iran signing up to the terrorist financing convention is one of four bills introduced by the Rouhani administration to make Iran compliant with FATF standards (read more about the FATF bills in a previous Iran Unfiltered).

The controversial bill was sent to parliament for approval after an arduous debate among senior officials. On September 25th, after a meeting on the bill on Iran’s ascension to the terrorist financing (TF) convention in the parliament’s national security and foreign policy committee—which included speaker of parliament Ali Larijani, IRGC intelligence chief Hossein Taeb, representatives from the Intelligence Ministry and Foreign ministry, the head of the Central Bank, heads of the various parliamentary factions, and representatives from the Guardian Council—the bill was sent to parliament for review.

The proponents of Iran passing the FATF standards, of which the Rouhani administration is at the forefront, argue it is critical to maintaining financial ties with Europe, China, and Russia after U.S. sanctions are reimposed. Tehran MP Mahmoud Sadeghi recently tweeted that Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei now also supports parliament passing the anti-money laundering bill in line with FA22TF.

Meanwhile, FATF opponents argue that the bills will hinder Iran’s ability to support regional allies such as Hezbollah. On Sunday, September 30th, roughly 200 demonstrators protested outside of parliament against the bill being passed. Among the demonstrators were MPs from the hardline Jebhe Paydari faction.

On October 3rd, MP Akbar Ranjbarzadeh, a member of the parliamentary speaker’s board, announced that head of the parliament’s national security and foreign policy committee will hold a meeting on Sunday (October 7th) to discuss the FATF bills.

 

Aftermath of Ahvaz Terrorist Attack

On Monday, October 1st, Iran launched missile and drone strikes against ISIS targets in Al Bukamal, Syria. According to Amir Ali Hajizadeh, commander of Aerospace Force of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, the strikes killed 40 ISIS fighters, including a senior ISIS member who was Mosul’s district commander. Six ballistic missiles of the “Zolfaghar” and “Ghiam” designation were fired in the operation, which was coupled with a simultaneous attack by seven armed drones.

Mohammad Bagheri, chief of staff of Iran’s Armed Forces, declared that the strikes were in response to the September 22nd Ahvaz terrorist attack. Bagheri proclaimed: “The initial stage of revenge for the Ahvaz terrorist attack has been implemented, and the next stage of revenge will also take place.” He said of the Ahvaz attack perpetrators: “The terrorists took advantage of a parade and came into a crowd and blindly shot at people. These terrorists were supported by the terrorist group Daesh [ISIS] and another terrorist group, whose leaders are in European countries.”

Bagheri provided further details of the military operation. He stated: “The broad missile and drone operation of the Armed Forces had immense value in that it was the first time these drones traversed the skies of several countries and accurately struck their targets and inflicted heavy losses on the enemy. The missiles also traversed over 550 kilometers to right where the enemy was deployed. Another stage of revenge will also occur.”

Bagheri added that Iran had intelligence that the Ahvaz attack perpetrators were guided by ISIS. He declared: “Intelligence work by the various agencies has revealed that the terrorists, on top of having connections to anti-revolutionary groups, took instruction from Daesh and Daesh from Deir ez-Zabador [in Syria] guided them.”

On September 24th, a few days after the Ahvaz attack, Ayatollah Khamenei had blamed ISIS for the attack in a speech to Iranian athletes who won medals at the Asian Games. Ayatollah Khamenei stated at the time: “Based on reports, this cowardly act was the work of those same people who, whenever they are challenged in Syria and Iraq, the Americans come to save them, and their hands are in the pockets of the Saudis and Emiratis.”

Ali Shamkhani, the secretary of Iran’s Supreme National Security Council, used the missile strikes to respond to U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton’s remarks at a “United Against Nuclear Iran” summit in New York City last week, where Bolton warned Iran of “hell to pay” and “serious consequences.” Shamkhani declared: “Bolton announced that we should take them seriously. Commander Hajizadeh [head of the IRGC’s aerospace force] has taken you seriously and has fired missiles to within 3 miles of you.” He added: “Trump in all his remarks declared Iran to be a threat, so all of us in the face of this all-out war which he is waging against us, must embrace a war footing.”

The Ahvaz terrorist attack on a commemoration parade marking the anniversary of Iraq’s 1980 invasion of Iran, which left 25 dead, was vociferously condemned by Iranian civil society. On September 24th, a group of 470 prominent Iranian political and civil society activists signed a letter condemning the Ahvaz terrorist attacks. Signatories included: dissident cleric Mohsen Kadivar, Nobel Peace Prize-recipient Shirin Ebadi, human rights activist Emadeddin Baghi, leading reformist thinkers Mostafa Tajzadeh and Saeed Hajarian, former political prisoner and Velayat e-Faqih critic Alireza Rajaei, the sons of Green Movement leader Mehdi Karroubi, and many others.

The letter condemned the terrorist attack while also calling for removing economic and political drivers for domestic unrest. The letter stated: “We human rights and civil society activists who have attached our hearts to Iran’s independence and territorial integrity and global peace and stability, while expressing our condolences to the families affected by this savage crime, condemn the political, financial, and media accomplices of this type of violence and this terrorist action.” It added: “At the same level that we condemn this terrorist action and the cycle of violence, we believe that the economic and social grounds [of violence] must be removed through holistic development and eliminating every type of discrimination between all ethnic groups and religious sects.”

 

Corruption Probe Amid Exonerations and New Arrests

Bahram Parsaei, an MP representing Shiraz, denounced the recent arrest of a member of Shiraz’s city council, Mahdi Hajati, before parliament. Hajati was recently arrested after voicing support for two detained members of the Bahai faith. Parsaei declared to parliament: “In the days after Mr. Hajati’s arrest, I spoke with the governor, the head of the [security] council, and the political deputy of Fars province’s governor. We all believe that the arrest of Hajati under these circumstances is not in the interests of the [ruling] system. Mr. Hajati is the youngest member of the city council in Shiraz, who merely defended the rights of several citizens.”

Majid Sarsangi, Tehran University’s cultural deputy, announced that of the Tehran University students arrested during last winter’s protests, over 70 percent, or 25 of them, have been exonerated. Sarsanagi stated: “Fortunately, about 25 of the students were either exonerated or given light and suspended sentences. We are hopeful that the rest of the students remaining can in the same way in the appeals court be exonerated or given light sentences.”

Sarsanagi also announced that no students, regardless of whether they are still awaiting trial, would be prevented from signing up for classes and continuing their studies. He proclaimed: “Fortunately, for all the students who were faced with security problems, whether those exonerated or those still in the courts, there is no prohibition for them to continue classes and their studies at the university. All these students can register for class as they normally would and go to class.”

Gholamhossein Mohseni-Ejei, deputy head of Iran’s judiciary, announced that 35 individuals have been tried for corruption, and that three of them would be executed. Ejei stated: “In regard to confronting economic corruption, special courts have been set up in Tehran which in recent days have sentenced 35 individuals. Of these, three individuals have been sentenced to execution … however this sentence will have to be confirmed by the Supreme Court.”

Former reformist President Mohammad Khatami delivered a speech where he stressed the necessity of reforms and greater freedoms. Khatami opined: “The system has to reform itself, or else it will face serious and big problems … Violence results not only from a lack of dialogue, but also from not meeting some of the needs of society, and hopelessness in meeting these needs.” He added: “Freedom of speech and freedom after speech is vital for increasing common understanding in society … We have to allow the opponents of religion to speak to produce greater thinking.”

 

Foreign Policy Developments

Former Deputy Foreign Minister for Arab Affairs Hossein Amir Abdollahian gave a far-reaching interview to the moderate-conservative Alef discussing his tenure and Iran’s foreign relations. Abdollahian stated that there are some differences between Iran and Russia over Syria: “One of the most successful areas of Iran-Russia cooperation is on Syria, but on [the question of] whether we have a common approach on everything regarding the Syrian issue, we will not have a common view on the Zionist regime and the resistance.”

Abdollahian said that while he initially believed Iran could not trust Russia, his view has since changed. He stated: “Four years ago I had a meeting with Putin’s representative for the Middle East, Mikhail Bogdanov. I told him that the Iranian people’s historical experience with Russia is not positive and they believe that the Russians at the 90th minute abandon their friends and only act in line to advance their own interests.” He added: “However, my view was changed with the cooperation we had over Syria and in other parts of the region with Putin. I believe that Russia and Putin can be trusted, as long as there are mutual interests between Tehran and Moscow.”

Ali Akbar Salehi, head of Iran’s Atomic Energy Organization, responded to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s accusations during his UN General Assembly speech last week regarding alleged secret Iranian nuclear sites. Salehi mocked Netanyahu’s claims, declaring: “Mr. Benjamin Netanyahu has really made a fool of himself this time. His lies are blatantly evident. We have an expression called Nakoja-Abad, but from Netanyahu’s remarks we don’t know if the place he’s referring to is Torquz-Abad or Dorquz-Abad … the AEOI totally rejects these claims by Netanyahu … What I can say is that definitely no documents have been taken from the AEOI.”

On October 3rd, Iran’s Central Bank governor Abdolnaser Hemati traveled to Moscow to implement agreements reached during Russian President Vladimir Putin’s recent trip to Iran. According to reports, Hemati was due to meet his Russian counterpart and other senior Russian officials.

Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei delivered a defiant speech calling for resilience in the face of U.S. pressure before an audience of Basij paramilitary forces at Tehran’s Azadi stadium. Ayatollah Khamenei strongly rejected Iran accepting U.S. terms, proclaiming: “The enemy wants the Iranian people to conclude that there is no solution other than submitting to America. I explicitly declare that people in the countries who promote this line of thinking are betraying the country. As long as I have life, I won’t allow this to happen in this country [giving into U.S. terms].”



Below Please Find More Detailed Quotations and Translations:

On Saturday, September 29th, the Economic Coordination Council gave authority over the currency market to the Central Bank.

  • On Sunday, September 30th, the Central Bank announced that 11 banks would provide for the currency needs of the public and that their names would be announced in the coming days.

On October 2nd, reformist Entekhab gave a run-down of the situation with the currency exchange rate. Entekhab notes that currency dealers—who sold dollars at a high exchange rate—are incurring losses and are only willing to buy dollars for a low price to maximize their profit.

  • Gholamreza Tajgardoon, the head of the parliament’s committee on planning and the budget, said of the strengthening of the Rial: “We predict that if nothing special happens and the Central Bank can effectively manage the market, the trend of a lower exchange rate will continue until an appropriate average value is reached.”
  • Entekhab states: “The permission granted to the Central Bank to intervene in the free market exchange rate through banks and currency dealers in the past week has resulted in the Central Bank obligating banks to provide hard currency to meet the needs of citizens. These needs include currency for students, research, medical purposes, and civilian aviation equipment.”
  • Entekhab states: “The publication of this news that from now on banks and currency dealers will meet all the needs of the people for hard currency, has impacted the psychological mood of the free market exchange rate.”
  • Entekhab states: “Additionally, the agreement with Europe to create a vehicle for trade with Iran—despite the sanctions imposed by the US—can be one of the impactful reasons affecting the psychology of the currency market.”

On October 2nd, the Central Bank instructed all banks that are licensed for currency exchange to buy currency from the people.

On October 2nd, economics-focused outlet Donya Eqtesad published an in-depth report examining multiple factors for the rebounding Iranian Rial.

  • Donya Eqtesad states: “On the third day of the week [Monday], right at the beginning of the day the dollar reached its peak value at 17,000 tomans and after that began decreasing and reached around 15,000 tomans.”
  • Donya Eqtesad: “Experts have two different views over the decrease in the price of the dollar. One group believes that the rapid price fall in the third day of the week was a price correction. In their view, the speculators gradually began selling off their purchases from past few weeks and are searching for a new floor to start buying again.”
  • Donya Eqtesad: “Other reasons are also heard in the market. The new authorities given to the Central Bank to intervene in the market, the announcement of a new mechanism by which the Central Bank will provide currency, the likelihood that the FATF bills will be approved in the coming days, the positive view many traders have of the agreement between Iran and Europe, the increase in the price of oil … are all other reasons that, in the view of experts, have had an impact in changing the trajectory of the market.”
  • Donya Eqtesad: “In the view of some experts, the price correction occurred because many traders had lost hope in the price [of the dollar] continuing to increase.”
  • Donya Eqtesad: “Some currency traders at the beginning of the month [late September] bought dollars for around 14,000 tomans. After the price of dollars reached a ceiling of 19,000 tomans, they gradually became sellers [of dollars] and made a lot of profit from such selling and buying.”
  • Donya Eqtesad: “With the decrease in the cost of the dollar to 17,000 tomans, major traders attempted to slow down their selling and keep this price as the floor.”
  • Donya Eqtesad: “According to the experts who believe that the decrease [in the cost of the dollar] on Monday was due to a price correction, the currency traders wanted to increase the selling of the dollars they had bought in the previous week to profit, and ready themselves to buy again at a lower price.”
  • Donya Eqtesad: “Another group believes that the authorities given to the Central Bank to intervene in the currency market caused speculators to stop buying dollars and start selling.”
  • Donya Eqtesad: “Others believe that the announcement of new policies by the Central Bank for providing currency, gave traders a signal to start selling … the signal was given to traders that the Central Bank that the Central Bank has enough currency to intervene in the market and meet the country’s needs.”

On Tuesday, October 2nd, the Supreme Economic Coordination Council held another meeting—chaired by President Hassan Rouhani and including the heads of Iran’s judiciary and legislative branches—to further discuss giving the Central Bank increased authorities to control the currency market.

  • The council passed a measure obligating the Central Bank to immediately make the necessary arrangements for the selling and purchasing of foreign currency from the exports of petrochemicals, steel, and other exports products and making the currency available in the secondary exchange market.
  • The Supreme Economic Coordination Council also passed a measure that would give five-year residency to citizens of foreign countries who invest at least $250,000 in Iran, based on criteria laid out by the government [Rouhani administration].

The debate over Iran passing legislation to meet the action plan set out by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) has gained intensity due to the prospect of parliament approving legislation for Iran’s ascension to the terrorist financing convention—one of four bills introduced by the Rouhani administration to make Iran compliant with FATF standards.

  • On September 25th, after a meeting on the bill on Iran’s ascension to the terrorist financing (TF) convention in the parliament’s national security and foreign policy committee—which included speaker of parliament Ali Larijani, IRGC intelligence chief Hossein Taeb, representatives from the Intelligence Ministry and Foreign ministry, the head of the Central Bank, heads of the various parliamentary factions, and representatives from the Guardian Council—the bill was sent to parliament for review.
  • The bill on Iran’s ascension to the terrorist financing (TF) convention is currently being debated in parliament.
  • FATF proponents argue that failure to meet the FATF standards will create major problems for European, Chinese, and Russian efforts to facilitate banking and financial relations with Iran in the face of reinstated U.S. sanctions.
  • FATF opponents argue that the four bills will hinder Iran’s ability to support regional Iranian allies such as Hezbollah.
  • On Sunday, September 30th, roughly 200 demonstrators protested outside of parliament against the bill being passed. Among the demonstratives were MPs from the hardline Jebhe Paydari faction.
  • Tehran MP Mahmoud Sadeghi has recently tweeted that Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khameni now supports parliament passing the anti-money laundering bill in line with FATF.

On October 3rd, MP Akbar Ranjbarzadeh, a member of the parliamentary speaker’s board, announced that head of the parliament’s national security and foreign policy committee will hold a meeting on Sunday (October 7th) to discuss the FATF bills.

On Saturday, September 22nd, a terrorist attack on a commemoration parade—marking the anniversary of Iraq’s 1980 invasion of Iran in the southwestern Iranian city of Ahvaz—left 25 dead, including a four-year-old child. The five attackers were also killed.

  • Both a separatist group, the Ahvaz National Resistance, which claims to represent Iran’s Arab minority, and the Islamic State claimed responsibility.
  • Statements by Iranian officials blamed the United States and its regional allies, Saudi Arabia, Israel, and the United Arab Emirates for supporting Iranian separatist groups and seeking to destabilize Iran.
  • In the immediate aftermath of the attack, Iran summoned the ambassadors of Britain, the Netherlands, and Denmark—countries in which the Ahvaz National Resistance operates.
  • In the wake of the attack, spokesman of the Iranian Armed Forces Abolfazl Shekarchi declared: “This terrorist attack occurred around 9am from a park behind where the parade was taking place in Qods Boulevard and the members of this terrorist team were connected to the takfiris, Mossad, and Saudi Arabia.”
  • Shekarchi: “The assailants first fired upon the people who were present during the parade, and in addition to martyring and wounding a number of the people, some of their bullets were then fired upon the military forces present at the parade and a number of them were also martyred and wounded.”
  • Shekarchi: “The terrorists wanted to move towards the officials who were present but the strong action of the security forces repelled them.”
  • Conservative Iranian MP Mojtaba Zolnour, said in response to the Ahvaz attack: “The terrorist attack in Ahvaz was the world of the mercenaries of global arrogance [the US] … the terrorist group ‘al-Ahvaz’ fought alongside [former Iraqi leader] Saddam Hussein and the Baathists, and was supported by Saddam’s regime during the Imposed War [the Iran-Iraq War], is now taking the lives of the kidns and people of our country.”

On September 23rd, the Revolutionary Guards released an official statement denouncing the attacks and pledging retaliation.

  • “The terrorist crime by the mercenaries of global arrogance [the US] and the reactionary [state] of the region in Ahvaz at the beginning of the Holy Defense Week and simultaneous with Muharram and the raising of the flag of Ashura and mourning for Hossein and the demonstration of the nation’s power and defensive readiness of the armed forces of the country, shows that the sworn enemies of Islamic Iran especially the Satanic gharbi, ebri, arabi [Western, Hebrew, and Arabic] triangle, unable and defeated to achieve their aims and sinister intentions, with their enmity towards the Iranian peoples’ unity, strength, authority, perseverance, and glory, are pursuing  a project of creating insecurity inside our Islamic homeland. They don’t hold back from any effort or plot and even are ready to target innocent women, children, and people with terrorist actions.”
  • “We assure the Leader and the Commander-in-Chief and all the people of Iran, based on prudence and higher-up policies, that in creating the necessary conditions and equipment to find and strongly punish the criminals in the geographic area of the region and beyond, we will not hold back in taking every effort.”

On September 24th, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei with Iranian athletes who won medals at the Asian Games. In his remarks, he partly discussed the Ahvaz attack and pointed the finger at ISIS as the perpetrator.

  • Ayatollah Khamenei: “This sour event shows yet again that the Iranian people in their honorable quest to progress and advance, have many enemies.”
  • Khamenei: “Based on reports, this cowardly act was the work of those same people who, whenever they are challenged in Syria and Iraq, the Americans come to save them, and their hands are in the pockets of the Saudis and Emiratis.”

On September 24th, a group of 470 prominent Iranian political and civil society activists signed a letter condemning the Ahvaz terrorist attacks.

Signatories included: dissident cleric Mohsen Kadivar, Nobel Peace Prize-recipient Shirin Ebadi, human rights activist Emadeddin Baghi, leading reformist thinkers Mostafa Tajzadeh and Saeed Hajarian, former political prisoner and Velayat e-Faqih critic Alireza Rajaei, the sons of Green Movement leader Mehdi Karroubi, and many others.

  • The letter stated: “We human rights and civil society activists who have attached our heart’s to Iran’s independence and territorial integrity and global peace and stability, while expressing our condolences to the families affected by this savage crime, condemn the political, financial, and media accomplices of this type of violence and this terrorist action.”
  • “We believe that such a terrorist action results in nothing but increasing violence and the securitization of society. Because the cycle of violence is against the interests and security of the country and hurts the Iranian people.”
  • “At the same level that we condemn this terrorist action and the cycle of violence, we believe that the economic and social grounds [of violence] must be removed through holistic development and eliminating every type of discrimination between all ethnic groups and religious sects.”

On October 2nd, Amir Ali Hajizadeh, commander of Aerospace Force of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, announced that missile and drone strikes against ISIS targets in Al Bukamal, Syria had killed 40 ISIS fighters, including a senior ISIS member who was Mosul’s district commander.

On October 2nd, Ali Shamkhani, the secretary of Iran’s Supreme National Security Council, responded to U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton’s remarks at a “United Against Nuclear Iran” summit in New York City last week, were Bolton warned Iran of “hell to pay” and “serious consequences.”

  • Shamkhani: “Bolton announced that we should take them seriously. Commander Hajizadeh [head of the IRGC’s aerospace force] has taken you seriously and has fired missiles to within 3 miles of you.”
  • Shamkhani: “Trump in all his remarks declared Iran to be a threat, so all of us in the face of this all-out war which he is waging against us, must embrace a war footing.”
  • Shamkhani: “I won’t say that sanctions have no effect, but our national capabilities are able to make them ineffective.”
  • Shamkhani: “We have been searching for the opportunity to eliminate the dependence our economy has on oil, and now conditions are ideal to achieve this.”

On October 1st, Mohammad Bagheri, Chief of Staff of Iran’s Armed Forces—the highest ranking military commander in the country—commented on the missile and drone strikes against ISIS positions in Al Bukamal, Syria.

  • Bagheri: “The initial stage of revenge for the Ahvaz terrorist attack has been implemented, and the next stage of revenge will also take place.”
  • Bagheri: “The terrorists took advantage of a parade and came into a crowd and blindly shot at people. These terrorists were supported by the terrorist group Daesh [ISIS] and another terrorist group, whose leaders are in European countries.”
  • Bagheri: “The broad missile and drone operation of the Armed Forces had immense value in that it was the first time these drones traversed the skies of several countries and accurately struck their targets and inflicted heavy losses on the enemy. The missiles also traversed over 550 kilometers to right where the enemy was deployed. Another stage of revenge will also occur.”
  • Bagheri: “Intelligence work by the various agencies has revealed that the terrorists, on top of having connections to anti-revolutionary groups, took instruction from Daesh and Daesh from Deir ez-Zor [in Syria] guided them.”
  • Bagheri: “The region were Daesh is based, to the east of the Euphrates, is under the control of the American army. These missiles struck an area close to where the Americans are in control.”

On September 23rd, former reformist President Mohammad Khatami gave a speech before students from Tehran University’s Islamic Students Association and Medical Science, condemning the Ahvaz terrorist attack and discussing the country’s situation.

  • Khatami: “The system has to reform itself, or else it will face serious and big problems.”
  • Khatami: “What will calm our society and give it hope in the future, is for us to feel that that government officials listen to criticisms. The space for dialogue in society has been closed.”
  • Khatami: “Violence results not only from a lack of dialogue, but also from not meeting some of the needs of society, and hopelessness in meeting these needs.”
  • Khatami: “Today in this sensitive period, beyond the issues of reformists and principlists, the issue of saving Iran and having national unity and solidarity is what is important.”
  • Khatami: “Freedom of speech and freedom after speech is vital for increasing common understanding in society.”
  • Khatami: “We have to allow the opponents of religion to speak to produce greater thinking.”

On September 30th, Majid Sarsangi, Tehran University’s cultural deputy, announced that of the Tehran University students arrested during last winter’s protests, over 70 percent, or 25 of them, have been exonerated.

  • Sarsangi: “As has been announced, the appeal court process of many of the students arrested in the Day month [late December/early January] protests continued until the end of Shahrivar month [end of September], and only six of these students haven’t been sentenced and thus haven’t gone to the appeals court.”
  • Sarsangi: “Fortunately, about 25 of the students were either exonerated or given light and suspended sentences. We are hopefully that the rest of the students remaining can in the same way in the appeals court be exonerated or given light sentences.”
  • Sarsangi: “Fortunately, for all the students who were faced with security problems, whether those exonerated or those still in the courts, there is no prohibition for them to continue classes and their studies at the university. All these students can register for class as they normally would and go to class.”

On October 1st, Bahram Parsaei, an MP representing Shiraz, denounced the recent arrest of a member of Shiraz’s city council, Mahdi Hajati, before parliament. Hajati was recently arrested after voicing support for two detained members of the Bahai faith.

  • Parsaei stated: “In the days after Mr. Hajati’s arrest, I spoke with the governor, the head of the [security] council, and the political deputy of Fars province’s governor. We all believe that the arrest of Hajati under these circumstances is not in the interests of the [ruling] system. Mr. Hajati is the youngest member of the city council in Shiraz, who merely defended the rights of several citizens.”

On September 30th, Gholamhossein Mohseni-Ejei, deputy head of Iran’s judiciary, announced that 35 individuals had been tried for corruption, and that three of them would be executed.

  • Ejei: “In regard to confronting economic corruption, special courts have been set up in Tehran which in recent days have sentenced 35 individuals. Of these, three individuals have been sentenced to execution … however this sentence will have to be confirmed by the Supreme Court.”

On September 23rd, senior Rouhani advisor and Vice-President Mohammad Baqer Nobakht, voiced opposition to negotiations with the United States and stressed the importance of Iran’s independence.

  • “The Iranian peoples’ pursuit of independence resulted in governance that doesn’t accept foreign [impositions] and in the past 40 years since the victory of the Islamic Revolution it can pay the costs being independent.”
  • “Today the Iranian people and government, just as during the beginning of the revolution and the eight years of holy defense, are facing problems that are in response and a recompense for being independent.”
  • “For them to demand to align with their policies and negotiate goes against the strategic policies and principles of the system of the Islamic Republic of Iran.”

On September 24th, former Deputy Foreign Minister for Arab Affairs Hossein Amir Abdollahian gave a far-reaching interview to the moderate-conservative Alef discussing his tenure and Iran’s foreign relations.

  • Abdollahian said of Iran’s relations with Russia: “One of the most successful areas of Iran-Russia cooperation is on Syria, but on [the question of] whether we have a common approach on everything regarding the Syrian issue, we will not have a common view on the Zionist regime and the resistance.”
  • Abdollahian on America’s presence in Syria: “During the Trump era, the Americans don’t know what they’re doing in Syria. America’s approach in Syria is passive and symbolic now and Americans are unable to have any consequential role in Syria. This is because they’re confused in the face of the developments in Syria, but they nevertheless are making efforts to lie and take credit for the victories in Syria to the extent they can.”
  • Abdollahian on whether Iran can trust Russia: “Four years ago I had a meeting with Putin’s representative for the Middle East, Mikhail Bogdanov. I told him that the Iranian people’s historical experience with Russia is not positive and they believe that the Russians at the 90th minute abandon their friends and only act in line to advance their own interests.
  • Abdollahian: “However, my view was changed with the cooperation we had over Syria and in other parts of the region with Putin. I believe that Russia and Putin can be trusted, as long as there are mutual interests between Tehran and Moscow.”

On October 1st, Ali Akbar Salehi, head of Iran’s Atomic Energy Organization, responded to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s accusations during his UN General Assembly speech last week regarding alleged secret Iranian nuclear sites.

  • Salehi: “Mr. Benjamin Netanyahu has really made a fool of himself this time. His lies are blatantly evident. We have an expression called Nakoja-Abad, but from Netanyahu’s remarks we don’t know if the place he’s referring to is Torquz-Abad or Dorquz-Abad [expressions that in Persian mean “nowhere” or “middle of nowhere”]… the AEOI totally rejects these claims by Netanyahu.”
  • Salehi: “What I can say is that definitely not documents have been taken from the AEOI.”
  • Salehi: “Right now the level of cooperation between Iran and the IAEA is very good. The IAEA has until now on 12 occasions reported on Iran’s peaceful nuclear activities. In these reports, it is emphasized that Iran is abiding by all its commitments within the JCPOA, and its safeguards agreement and the additional protocol.”

On October 3rd, Iran’s Central Bank governor Abdolnaser Hematitravelled to Moscow on Wednesday to implement agreements reached during Russian President Vladimir Putin’s recent trip to Iran.According to reports, Hemati was due to meet his Russian counterpart and other senior Russian officials.

On October 4th, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei delivered a defiant speech calling for resilience in the face of U.S. pressure before an audience of Basij paramilitary forces at Tehran’s Azadi stadium.

  • Ayatollah Khamenei warned of a “media war” being waged against Iran: “The enemy uses this tool. The media tool in the hands of the enemy is dangerous. The media is just like chemical weapons in a real war.”
  • On the economy: “We have economic problems. We have an oil economy, which is a major problem. We don’t have a cultural of frugality and savings. But these aren’t the real problem. The real problem is hitting a dead end, which thankfully we have not.”
  • “The real problem is that the nation’s youth have no solution [to their problems] but to embrace the enemy. Some seek to tell this to our youth.”
  • On rejecting U.S. terms: “The enemy wants the Iranian people to conclude that there is no solution other than submitting to America. I explicitly declare that people in the countries who promote this line of thinking are betraying the country. As long as I have life, I won’t allow this to happen in this country [giving into U.S. terms].”
  • “The American president has told some people to be patient, that within two or three months the Islamic Republic will collapse. I remember the poetry that says, the camel dreams of cotton-wool [akin to hungry cat dreams of mice].”

 

 

About Author

Sina ToossiSina ToossiSina Toossi joined the National Iranian American Council as a Research Associate in July 2018. In this role, Sina conducts research and writing on U.S.-Iran relations, Iranian politics, and Middle East policy issues. Sina has been published in Newsweek, The National Interest, The Huffington Post, The Atlantic Council’s IranSource, ThinkProgress, and The Washington Quarterly.
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