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"Iran: A Forgotten Glory" - A Young Artist's Legacy Lives On

"Iran: A Forgotten Glory" is the five-year effort of the young director Makan Karandish. Shot in more than sixty locations, this documentary is a rich source of information about Achaemenids and Sassanids, the two Great Persian Empires.

Makan KarandishWashington, DC - A visually stunning portrait of Iran’s pre-Islamic history in the region of Fars, located in south west of the country, “Iran: A Forgotten Glory” is the five-year effort of the young director Makan Karandish. Shot in more than sixty locations, this documentary is a rich source of information about Achaemenids and Sassanids, the two Great Persian Empires.

The first time Karandish visited the Province of Fars, he wondered “how is it possible that a land which was once the center of civilization, today is looked upon by many westerners and even our own young generation as a backward and primitive nation?” Karandish was especially hurt to witness how mainstream media and movies such as 300 in the West distorted the image of Iran and Iranian history. So, he embarked on a journey “to promote and familiarize the world and the young Iranian generation to our culture and heritage and to present an accurate view of our nation.”

Makan Karandish directed and produced the movie with his own financing and some of the most up-to-date equipment, which were not available in Iran at the time. He created a never before seen collection of footage from historical sites, palaces and ruined cities of Fars along with a detailed narrative of the history behind each location. Not only does Karandish’s work delve deep into the practical purposes and mythical meanings behind the architects of palaces and cities such as Persepolis, but it also elaborates on the social, administrative, military and cultural changes important to Persian Kings, which helped bring about a democratic and advanced society.

Such passion for art and perfection, however, was not a new phenomenon for Karandish. Growing up in an artistic family, not only did he pursue what he had studied, but also fulfilled a dream his father could not follow as a young man interested in filmmaking. Unfortunately, the promising talent and work of Karandish was interrupted by his early death. Even though we could no longer witness other thrilling works from this young talented filmmaker, Makan Karandish’s legacy lives on through “Iran: A Forgotten Glory.”  His family and friends remember him as a young man passionate for his country, as a musician who played the santoor, setar and the guitar beautifully, and as a filmmaker who contributed to better understanding of Iranian history “in a time when both internal and external forces attempt to undermine our national identity.”

For more information on “Iran:  The Forgotten Glory,” visit www.farsmovie.com.  For information on upcoming screening, click here to join the Makan Foundation Facebook page. 

 

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